5 Quick And Easy Outreach Tips To Increase Your Conversions

5 Quick And Easy Outreach Tips To Increase Your Conversions

7 quick and easy outreach tips to increase your conversions

In this episode, you’ll discover easy techniques that you can apply to your outreach campaigns, so simple and common sense, yet other marketers don’t practice them well in their pitches. 

At the end of this episode, you’ll realize the basic rules in outreach often unwritten, because too many marketers are focused on the next big thing without realizing that the fundamentals make a good headstart and big difference. 

 

The first in this list of outreach tips is to:

Choose your word intent

What most marketers fail at when writing email copies is that they’re writing it for themselves, not for the recipient. 

So words that make sound enticing to them, but not really adding any meaning to what they offer in their copy. 

Word intent means that you choose carefully your words (verbs/nouns) so you would be more helpful for your target prospect, and not be perceived as misleading or confusing in your message. 

For instance, in the broken link building strategy, there is one small yet crucial detail in word intent. That is using “found” in emails. So you might say, “I found this broken link on your page”.

By saying “found”, what you intend to d, the intent is that you as the person doing the outreach are looking for the broken link.

So instead of saying you found it, why not you say you just encountered it. By using this word instead, you get to show the intent of the word, like you’re someone who just stumbled upon an error on the page and wants them to fix it. 

So choose what words to use in your outreach copy, to make it less on just pursuing them for links, but rather giving them value as webmaster or publishers. 

The next outreach tip is:

Invest in conversations

It’s easy to send a pitch then get a link from a single response from your target webmaster, publisher, or link prospect.

But it doesn’t what most high-quality link building conversations happen.

It starts with simple conversations, ending in some long threads - depending on the strategy, the value you’re giving. 

When your intent as a marketer is just to get the link right away, the conversation goes south. The webmaster could easily feel what you’re up to, why you’re sending them an email. 

So it’s very important to have your content marketers, or you yourself if you’re the one doing the outreach, be patient in your outreach emails.

One thing that makes conversations lengthier, as usual, is sometimes the contact person you’re reaching out to, isn’t the person responsible for adding the link on their website. In that case, he/she would have just forward to you another email or contact person. 

Now, you may be creating a new email to send your initial pitch or simply just forward the conversation along with the new contact person.

Link building takes time, not only in creating the content but also in having conversations in email. So be patient. Invest in conversations. 

Another strong outreach tip is to:

Show credibility in your offer

You know your content. You know what it brings to the table. But your recipient doesn’t have any idea about what is it about. 

By showing the credibility of your offer - your content, you’re telling them it deserves a spot on their page/website. That is worthy of being mentioned, shared, or linked to from one of their pages.

If you’re sharing with them a comprehensive guide on a certain topic, describe to them what makes it credible. Is it because of the authors behind it? Are they experts or experienced professionals in the industry? By making your pitch about your prospects and for their readers, the likelihood of getting a favor from them is higher. 

The next outreach angle to look at is:

Use the power of association 

By associating yourself with other like-minded people, especially the ones in higher authority or influence, you get to perceive yourself in the market as someone in the group as well. 

So if you want to take your outreach emails to the next level, you can add partners/publishers you’ve been associated in the past to increase the authority and credibility of your pitch.

Association provides a way for recipients to know who you really are. This builds social proof and increases trust between you and them. 

One critical factor we’re looking at when working with enterprise brands is association. It’s so much easy to get backlinks from publishers once they know what our client brand is all about. 

Yes, it’s about the quality of content. But in the sea of sameness, one thing that will differentiate your pitch is how you establish the credibility of your website/brands. And that would be achievable through association. 

Don’t forget to follow-up prospects.

Sounds like very common sense, but often a forgotten rule in outreach, especially if you’re sending emails to hundreds of emails.

The ones you’ve contacted using their contact forms on their websites would be missed out opportunities, given it’s an extra effort to contact them again through contact forms.

1 to 2 follow-up emails will do. Overdoing it will kill your outreach campaign. Be careful not to make your email a spam email account.

Gentle follow-ups are important to make sure you’re reiterating the value of your pitch. But please don’t just copy and paste your initial email. Restructure follow-ups in such a way that is just a reminder of what they’ve missed (few details of the value, not the entirety of it).

So there you go, you discovered 5 quick and easy tips to increase conversions in your outreach campaign. 

Before you go, I have a special gift for you.  if you’re looking for ways to build backlinks to your online store or you’re stuck as to what link building strategy to use for your website, simply go to the description of this podcast episode. 

Go to either of the two resources I shared there. One resource is a blueprint that I and my team have used to scale ink building for clients and another resource for link building opportunities in the eCommerce space.  Go and grab those resources so that you won’t have to worry about how to do link building for your website. 

For more link building and content marketing tips, be sure to subscribe to this podcast to get notified of the latest episodes. Just click the “Follow” button. See you in our next episode.


How to 3x Link Placement Rate Using This One Model

How to 3x Link Placement Rate Using This One Model

TRANSCRIPT:

How to triple your link placement rate using this one model.

In this episode, we’ll look at this one marketing model that most marketers ignore but are very fundamental as to how you can capture your link prospects and get them to take your desired action. 

At the end of this episode, you can take your outreach to the next level by following this ultra-simple email model. 

 

When you read articles today on SEO, most of them are just rehashed of content created either by Brian Dean, Neil Patel, or Rand Fishkin. If you’re not familiar with these three big names, they popularized so many techniques in the internet marketing space today.

But what most people don’t realize is that the basic -- the fundamental technique is what makes old and today’s existing strategy more effective than ever.

One, in particular, is in writing outreach copy for links.

Email templates from different SEO articles have been used by marketers, which leads to its ineffectiveness. 

Those email templates weren’t effective,  not because the template is simply used by many - that the more people are seeing it, the differentiation for that matter decreases. And thus, its effectiveness in persuading people to link to your website.

But those email templates were not effective because marketers themselves, the ones who are sending emails don’t really understand the psychology of writing one. 

If you know the psychology behind writing an outreach template that gets people's attention and takes them to any action, the likelihood of your outreach success is much greater than the rest of the email senders. 

To triple your link placement rate - meaning your number of links you acquire for every outreach, you can use this marketing model - AIDA.

AIDA is a conventional model in marketing that stands for:

  • Attention
  • Interest 
  • Desire
  • Action

Let’s start with attention. 

Attention: What makes you interesting? 

Like any marketing material, you have to grab the attention of your intended audience.

In link building, it’s your potential linkers.

What they will see in the first line of your email will determine whether or not they’ll finish reading it. 

It’s very obvious, but still, marketers don’t see it as common sense. 

Catch your audience's attention to create awareness about what you offer -- whether that’s a content, story, or tip. 

A good tip is not to use any flashy cliches or clickbaity subject lines just to get your linkers’ attention.

It’s like having a product. The more you get people to believe in many things, the less likely to buy from you. But if you let them believe only in one thing and emphasize that with value, education, you’re more likely to get more customers from it.

The same is true with writing emails. Let them believe only in one thing.

So from writing your subject line to your first lines of an email, what do you want your audience to believe in your email pitch? 

Do not make any inauthentic claims or compliments just to let your publishers click on it. 

Remember these people have been receiving hundreds of emails every week (probably for top editors), they know which one stands out simply by reading your subject line.

Instead of doing that, why not simply describe your email pitch?

A recommended subject line for asset promotion email pitch is:

[Asset type] for [Site name]

Very straightforward but grabs the attention of your linkers. You know what their website is, and if you have an asset that’s easily recognizable, and they themselves have published the same content type, there is a quick capture of attention in there.

Think of your subject line and the first line of email copy as a way to open the lock in their doors. The opportunity can be missed easily if you take this thing carelessly. 

Interest: Why should your reader open your email? 

You have to answer the question: why should your reader open your email?

Next is to drive interest by connecting with your reader. 

In here, you want to keep your link prospect to read the entire email. 

This is when you would want to connect to your backlink target. A good connection helps you build a good link. 

Have you built a relationship with the person in the past? How did you find them? What is one thing that connects you and them? 

That’s the reason why it’s important to have pre-engagement initiatives before you even send people cold outreach.

Pre-engagement activities include sharing one of their social media posts or commenting on their blog. 

But of course, most of the time, you’re sending cold outreach emails. And this is the hardest part of all - finding that connection.

What you can do here is use the content as a gateway connection to them. What makes your content connected to its readers? If it’s something that is valuable in information, data, and any value therein, it can serve as a bridge between you and your target linker.

Always make your target prospect glued to your outreach email. Let him or her read it from start to finish. 

The third important component in the AIDA model is: 

Desire: What's in it for them? 

The question you need to answer and make it emphasized so well in your outreach email is, what’s in it for them?

Like a normal person would ask, WIFM should be every marketer’s emphasis in an outreach email. 

Time is an asset, so never waste your prospect’s time.

The last thing you want to do is to waste your outreach prospect’s time by giving all the details as to why they should link to you, and not even bother on why they should care in the first place.

If you offer a free thing -- free content, infographic -- it is only free, but what makes this free interesting to them. 

Does it help solve a specific problem they have in their content? 

Because the more you think of your outreach prospect, the more you care for them, the more you realize your outreach isn’t about you, it’s about them.

And the last piece in this AIDA puzzle is:

Action: What action do you want them to take? 

Taking action includes linking to your content piece, using it as a reference in their future works, sharing your content, getting their insight for a story, round-up, or whatever curated content you’re about to create. 

“I’d love to hear your thoughts on this… if you’re interested…” these kinds of statements spark a sense of action. 

If you want them to take action, tell them. It doesn’t hurt to ask for an action. 

You’re not demanding here and manipulative, but rather showing empathy and value for their time. Once you’ve emphasized the “value” of your pitch -- what’s in it for them? you can get to take an action. 

So there you go, you have discovered this simple model of AIDA to get more links from your outreach campaigns. 

Before you go, I have a special gift for you.  if you want done-for-you email templates, simply go to the description of this podcast episode. Go to the link that I shared there. These are email templates for link building strategies that you can easily copy and paste and get results for your outreach campaign. 

For more link building and content marketing tips, be sure to subscribe to this podcast to get notified of the latest episodes. Just click the “Follow” button. See you in our next episode. 


How to Pitch Content in Email Outreach Without Being Pushy and Manipulative

How to Pitch Content in Email Outreach Without Being Pushy and Manipulative

TRANSCRIPT:

How to pitch content in email outreach without being pushy and manipulative

In this episode, we’re going to dive into some techniques on how you can persuade your potential linkers to link to you by applying one simple trick in email outreach. 

At the end of this episode, you’ll discover a way to make your content more irresistible, like a product/service to get your prospects to take any action. 

 

Link building involves persuasion

One of the things that marketers don’t understand is that link building isn’t about you. Link building isn’t about pushing them to link to you without providing any value beforehand.

Link building is like selling. 

You have to know the psychology of why people buy from you -- in this case, you’re not selling any product or service, but rather your content. Whether that content is a guest post, visual assets, interactive content, or a story of your brand.

If you know these simple tips, you’ll be able to pitch your content in email outreach in a way that gets people’s attention -- so they’ll end up promoting your content piece, with links to your website. 

Emphasize the intended value of your content

The psychology of link building is leaning towards the value of content - and you may have heard, but it’s the truth before you even craft your email pitch.

Knowing the value, particularly, the intended value of your content. Well, that means your content has a specific objective to achieve and measure.

So if you’re offering a free guest article for a blog, the intended value is education for the part of the readers. 

Understanding that, you wouldn’t pitch without thinking of your prospect’s existing readers in mind. Your topics would lean towards the untapped topics the blog hasn’t published yet. 

Now, this leads us to the second tip, which is:

Know what differentiates your content from its competitors

With hundreds of emails, journalists and publishers are receiving probably every single day, you would want your email to stand among email pitches.

How can you do that, is simply to look for this thing called: unique value proposition.

A unique value proposition makes your content more irresistible. 

Who would want to promote your content if it is not the same old stuff people see but rather coming from a unique angle or a brand new topic.

Look at your competing content and what are the things they haven’t included in their assets, so you can include it in your content piece. 

Either your content asset becomes long-form, or it includes data points or other content formats like videos and graphics that make the content more diverse in terms of learning styles. 

When writing your email pitch, think of what makes your content standout targeting the right audience of your prospect.

Including data points for example if it is a statistics or survey type of content can best work. 

Use copywriting technique to get prospects glued to your email

The moment your prospects open your email, you want them to read the entire email from start to its finish.

The way to do that is not to turn your boring email into an irresistible email pitch. 

One technique that you can use is a copywriting tip: grease-slide copy

Grease-slide copy is a copywriting technique used to keep readers glued to the page.  

You can insert phrases to your email to let your target linkers read through the copy without them even realizing it.

So phrases like:

  • But wait – there’s more. 
  • Yes, you read that right! 
  • We’re not through yet.

The whole point of grease-slide words and phrases is simple, once you start reading, you can’t stop reading. It’s the perfect tool for an outreach email because it helps you quickly connect to someone who probably doesn’t know who you are.

So there you go, you discovered 3 simple tricks to pitch your content to publishers and other potential linkers without being pushy and manipulative. 

Before you go, I have a special gift for you.  if you want done-for-you email templates, simply go to the description of this podcast episode. Go to the link that I shared there. These are email templates for link building strategies that you can easily copy and paste and get results for your outreach campaign. 

For more link building and content marketing tips, be sure to subscribe to this podcast to get notified of the latest episodes. Just click the “Follow” button. See you in our next episode. 


outreach emails

5 Common Mistakes Marketers Do When Writing Outreach Emails (These Are Costing You $$$)

One of the crucial skills when it comes to link building is the ability to write outreach emails that convert into links. If you can craft a pitch that gets your recipients’ attention and let them take action -- like promoting your content or giving your links, you’ll experience success with your campaigns. 

 

The first mistake is:

Exaggerating emails with too much personalization 

Personalizing emails means that you include details of the person you’re reaching out to. So things like name, website, where you even found them (the source), the topic of their content, so on and so forth. 

The idea of personalization has been overly used by marketers today. To think that when they personalize their emails, they would instantly have an edge over other people trying to get into the box of the recipient.

When done right, personalization is okay. 

Doing it in extreme, over personalizing like including details that are not true in the first place will only do more harm than good.

Avoid the mistake of staying you’re a fan of the blog if you only have read their articles. It is inauthentic. 

So rather than saying you’re a fan, why not simply admire their works. Saying “Impressive work on content” is better than “I’m a fan” - if you’re not really a fan.

Not clearly showing the offer and value of a pitch

What does it mean? 

Typically, there is an intention behind every outreach email. One outreach email is written to get a link from a blogger, another email is to build a partnership with a publisher to collaborate for a content piece, let’s say.

With this intention, there is value involved to offer to the prospect.

Either that is including the person as part of a round-up post, which is an exposure in itself. Or offering a free visual version of text-based content like an article.

If the value of the pitch is not clearly stated in the outreach email, you’re less likely to get a response, and therefore, get the promotion or links that you want.

You must understand that every prospect has this question in mind when reading emails, “what’s in it for me?”.

If you can answer that in your outreach email, you would avoid the mistake that other marketers do which is aggressively asking for a link, when they haven’t even shown what they can offer in value. 

One of the challenges in sending outreach emails is the ability to scale sending them off.

Scalability is a big challenge, that’s the reason why other marketers resort to using fake accounts - which is our third common mistake.

Using fake accounts to have more inbox capacity

They are using fake accounts to have more inbox capacity in place, and at the same, if they have made some mistakes with emails, there would be fewer damages to experience. 

The thing is: using fake accounts would probably hurt your brand.

Indirectly when you promote content from a brand, it depicts that the account has something to do with the brand -- either the person is working for the company, or is simply just sharing it. 

There is an indirect perceived value about your brand. So using fake accounts would hurt you. 

If you really want to improve results from your outreach campaign, you start using either a corporate domain account or an agency account. 

By using a real person, you don’t have to think of ways to prove the authenticity of your outreach email. You simply craft an email and send it.

Authenticity will be revealed sooner or later in your outreach email, so why not use real outreach accounts. 

Using blocks when writing outreach emails 

These are blocks of paragraphs composed of 5 to 10 sentences for each paragraph.

That itself affects the readability of your outreach email.

Imagine having to read a long-form outreach email from a person you didn’t know?

It is not enticing, isn’t it? 

Readability matters in outreach emails. Make your emails concise as much as possible. 

Do not fall into this idea of the “curse of knowledge” where you want to put all information in one single email. 

Remember the goal of the initial pitch is to capture the interest of the prospect, let them know of the value you are offering, and take even a micro action.

Giving the person the embed code of the infographic to be promoted on the blog or attaching a word doc file of your guest blog article in the first email is too many details.

So the next time you write your initial outreach email, make it simple.

Do not complicate things by adding details and make your email like they’re reading a book. 

And one of the most common mistake marketers that you should be avoided at all costs is not proofreading your emails before sending them. 

Not proofreading your emails before sending them 

Most marketers and SEOs use email templates to scale their outreach efforts. They have this template ready and available, and all they have to do is to copy and paste or use the insert option in their outreach platform, like the one in Gmail account. 

If you are careless when using outreach emails, you can make the mistake of not inserting the right inputs in the right fields in your email, such that, it’ll look like it’s an automated email. 

Mistakes like field names like [Name], or [BlogName] that are not replaced by the actual name of the recipient and the exact name of the Blog. 

So a quick solution to this to avoid this common outreach mistake is to have a quick glance or proofreading of the email before you schedule it or send it quickly. 

Have someone in the outreach team who is detail-oriented to make sure this mistake wouldn’t happen, or if it happens, it would be only a few percentages. 


guest blogging templates

5 Irresistible Guest Blogging Email Templates

 

Today, I’m gonna reveal my 5 email templates to help you pitch articles for blogs you want to contribute content for.

Our first irresistible guest blogging email template is what I call a contributor email template. 

You use this email template if you want to contribute an article to someone else’s blog.

 

Email Template #1: Contributor 

Subject: Writing for Example.com

Hey [First Name],

I’m [Your Name], and I write at [Yoursite.com]. I’m also a regular contributor at [mention a popular blog in your space].

I’m writing to you because I have article ideas that would be a perfect fit for [Example.com]’s audience.

Optional: I’ve been following [Example.com] for quite some time now, and I have shared [insert topic for their past article] in my social profiles, and even include a link on a piece I’ve written a while back [insert link to your post that links to their article].

If you’re open to new authors for your blog, let me know so I can send you the topics right away.

Looking forward to working together. 

Cheers!

[Your Name] 

 

I’m [Your Name], and I write at [Yoursite.com]. I’m also a regular contributor at [mention a popular blog in your space].

As you can see in the email template, the first part is plainly an introduction of who you are as an author - this includes your name, the blog you’re writing for and if you hvae other blogs you’ve contributed ocntnet in the past - you can include that s well. 

 

I’m writing to you because I have article ideas that would be a perfect fit for [Example.com]’s audience.

The second part is when you propose your content ideas. You are not giving the exact ideas, but simply just telling them that you have in mind -- which inspires curiosity on their part about what those ideas are. 

 

Optional: I’ve been following [Example.com] for quite some time now, and I have shared [insert topic for their past article] in my social profiles, and even include a link on a piece I’ve written a while back [insert a link to your post that links to their article].

You may include this part if you have shared or link to one post of your target blog. This tells them that you have given value even before you pitch them for guest blogging. It would elicit “reciprocity” which is a principle to get a favor from them by first giving them value. 

 

If you’re open to new authors for your blog, let me know so I can send you the topics right away.

Looking forward to working together. 

Cheers!

The closing part of this email template is just a call to action to get a response. If they’re interested, they’ll normally send you a reply asking what topic you have in mind. From then, you are one step through getting your post published on their blog. 

 

Email Template #2: Updated Version 

This second guest blogging email template is about offering your target blogs an opportunity to update their outdated content. 

So instead of them updating it by themselves which would take a lot of their time doing research, adding more tips just to make to the content more comprehensive, more readable and well-updated, you will do the legwork for them. 

 

Subject: Opportunity to update your content in [Site Name]

Hi [First Name],

I came across your post on [Topic] that you’ve published back in [Year] with the title, [Title of their post].

The content was well put together, though some of the ideas and information in it are already outdated. Just thought of asking if you have any plans of updating this content?

By the way, my name is [Your Name], and I work with [Your Site], where we’ve written dozens of practical guides about [Industry]. 

I know you have a lot on your plate, but I was just thinking that perhaps I can write the updated version for you instead.

Let me know if you’ll be interested to collaborate on a [year version of the topic]. I would love to help in any way possible.  

Cheers!

[Your Name]

 

Subject: Opportunity to update your content in [Site Name]

Hi [First Name],

I came across your post on [Topic] that you’ve published back in [Year] with the title, [Title of their post].

The first part tells your target guest blog the backstory of where did you find them, which is basically how you landed one of their articles.

 

The content was well put together, though some of the ideas and information in it are already outdated. Just thought of asking if you have any plans of updating this content?

This section is simply asking them a question, you’re not forcing them to link to you or give you the opportunity. Because you want to know first if they want to update the article first, before you can dive in and rewrite it. This saves you time updating an article for them without them giving you the opposition in the first place. 

 

By the way, my name is [Your Name], and I work with [Your Site], where we’ve written dozens of practical guides about [Industry]. 

I know you have a lot on your plate, but I was just thinking that perhaps I can write the updated version for you instead.

Let me know if you’ll be interested to collaborate on a [year version of the topic]. I would love to help in any way possible.  

Cheers!

[Your Name]

The last part of this guest blogging email template is your introduction, plus a call to action to let you know if they’re interested in that update opportunity. 

 

(pause)

Email Template #3: Guestographics

This third guest blogging email template is almost similar to the previous email copy of updating the post, but it is different in a way that you don’t offer just update of the article, but a visual version of the content, instead. 

 

Subject: Visual Content version of [Site Name’s & Title of Post]

Hey [First Name],

My name is [Your Name], and I work with [Your Site].

I came across your piece on [Topic]: [insert URL to their content]

Just wanted to ask if it’s okay with you if we make visual content based on your article (we’ll definitely include your logo on the graphic).

We’re planning to use it for an upcoming guide we’re creating (where we’d also link back to you). And we’ll probably distribute the graphic to other publications as well.

We can send you the final draft over so you can check. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks, [First Name].

Cheers!

[Your Name]

 

Subject: Visual Content version of [Site Name’s & Title of Post]

Hey [First Name],

My name is [Your Name], and I work with [Your Site].

I came across your piece on [Topic]: [insert URL to their content]

The first part of this email template is introducing yourself as an author and how did you know about the blog itself. 

 

Just wanted to ask if it’s okay with you if we make a visual content based on your article (we’ll definitely include your logo on the graphic).

We’re planning to use it for an upcoming guide we’re creating (where we’d also link back to you). And we’ll probably distribute the graphic to other publications as well.

We can send you the final draft over so you can check. Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks, [First Name].

[Your Name]

The next part is very important because you want to ask for permission before making any action -- creating a visual version of the content right away. 

Because if you can get them to go with that, you’ll have an opportunity not only to get a link from their article, as you’re one who created a graphic, but gain more visibility for your website given that they (the blog you’re pitching for) will distribute the content (with its visual version) to their followers and readers. 

 

Email Template #4: Invite guest bloggers to write for you

This next email template is all about inviting other bloggers to write for your blog. 

 

Subject: Hey [First Name] – Write for our readers at [Site Name]

Hi [First Name],

I’ve been seeing your work in our [mention your industry] and was able to read your post about [state the topic of their post[ and learned [share what you’ve learned on their article]. Fantastic work!

Anyway, I wanted to touch base to see if you’d be interested to write for [Your Site] as well. We have a continuously growing readership and we currently have [xxx number of monthly pageviews].

Our readers will certainly love to see you on our blog.

Let me know your thoughts, as we can publish your entry right away. 

Cheers! 

[Your Name]

 

Hi [First Name],

I’ve been seeing your work in our [mention your industry] and was able to read your post about [state the topic of their post[ and learned [share what you’ve learned on their article]. Fantastic work!

To get better results using this email, you must need to have a relationship built with the author. As you’re asking for him/her to write yours, he/she should’ve seen some of your content, or even have seen you offline. 

Nevertheless, a short introduction about who you are, how you find their website, and even include certain posts you found to be interesting - still works best. 

 

Anyway, I wanted to touch base to see if you’d be interested to write for [Your Site] as well. We have a continuously growing readership and we currently have [xxx number of monthly pageviews].

Our readers will certainly love to see you on our blog.

Let me know your thoughts, as we can publish your entry right away. 

The next part of the email should be straightforward - asking him or her to write for your blog. 

To persuade the author effectively, you should include some statistics about your blog. This may include your pageviews, or email subscribers. Of course, the higher these stats are, the better. 

Keep the conversation going when you receive a response from the author.

How you’ll be able to get this links from this process is basically when the author has written a post on his or her own blog, and use his guest posts on your blog as a reference. 

By having authors write for you blog, chances are you’ll receive natural backlinks by having these authors cite their own content, either on their own publications or other related blogs they contribute content for.

 

Email Template #5: Rapport building 

One of the challenges of starting a guest blogging campaign is knowing who to target - meaning who you should be reaching out to for guest blogging opportunities.

And the best way to find these opportunities is to ask your contacts. 

These are the people you’ve known to have their own blogs, as well as those bloggers you’ve contributed content already. 

Simply ask them if they know any blogs in the industry you could potentially reach out to for guest posts, as well. 

Once you have contacts from them, here’s an email template you can use:

 

Subject: Writing for Example.com 

Hi [First Name],

I learned your blog from my good friend, [state the name] of [name of their blog]. I found interesting and great insights on [state the topic of their post]. 

I'm interested to be a contributor to [name of their blog]. 

Here are the topics that I'm looking forward to writing about (based on my expertise): 

  • [Topic 1]
  • [Topic 2]
  • [Topic 3]

Cheers! 

[Your Name]


how to find journalists

How to Find Journalists to Cover Your Stories

How to find journalists who are looking to cover your stories without paying expensive PR tools like HARO.

By the way, you can use HARO. There’s nothing about the platform. But there is a way to find journalists and publishers without you even going to HARO.

It's a very simple platform where you only need is to have a list of phrases to search for, and there you'll see journalists, news writers, and publishers who could cover your story.

That platform, guess what? Is your social media platform - Twitter?

Yes, that’s right. Twitter.

So on Twitter, people are posting what they need - what they’re looking for. So in most cases, journalists, news writers, and publishers are using their Twitter accounts for work -- specifically looking for brands, and personalities who have interesting stories they can cover on their websites.

Now what you want to do is to use specific queries to find these journalists.

twitter search prospecting journalists

Examples of keywords you can use for Twitter search:

  • “Looking to speak to” #journorequest
  • “Looking to interview” #journorequest
  • “Is there anyone” expert #journorequest 
  • “Can you recommend” interview #journorequest

If you notice, these are phrases they naturally use when finding people they can interview. Questions like is there anyone or can you recommend? 

By using natural questions as part of your keywords, you’ll get more searches when finding journalists to cover your story. 


content promotion strategies

7 Content Promotion Strategies (That Actually Work)


When it comes to content promotion, the first to get started is not knowing what channels to promote your content in, but rather having an understanding of your content piece.

Before you promote your content, you have to know what makes your content valuable. 

The question you need to ask yourself is, “what makes your content valuable?”

Because if you see the value of your content, you can easily write captions for social media posting, you can easily write email templates to promote it to a cold audience, and even easily target the right audience -- because in the first place, you’ve identified what value your content offers. 

Find that value proposition. 

Now, here are 7 effective content promotion strategies that actually work.

Audience Banking

First is through audience banking. 

That is reaching out to your existing audience - this could be on social platforms or to your email list - if you have one.

You may have an existing following on social media services like Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter.

Start promoting your newly published content to your social followers.

The key here is to promote your content based on the context of the platform.

You don’t copy and paste the same stuff you post on one platform to another platform. On Twitter, you’re likely to see preview-like captions to describe what the content is about in a gist.

On Facebook, long-form caption writing may work best for you. As people tend to read more long-form captions today on that platform.

Know the context of the platform, and think of how you can best serve your audience with your content promotion strategy. 

Community Engagement 

Second is community engagement.

Community engagement means you don’t go to a Facebook group and quickly post a link to your content. 

Remember that community groups are more strict today than before. They have guidelines for posting to follow.

So it is best to have a few groups where you can engage with other audiences. 

Find community groups where your audience hangs out.

On Facebook, you can quickly search for which group you can engage in. Same with Linkedin. 

There are particular premium slack groups where you’ll get the most value from audience insights. 

The key to promoting your content in all of these groups is to think of value giving than just value getting. 

If there are questions that are relevant to what you’re doing, answer it with value. And if there is a resource that you think might be helpful for the audience, include a link to your content. 

External Content Contribution

The third effective content promotion method is external content contribution.

What you’ll do here is create content for other websites to promote your content on your blog. 

How is that possible?

When you write content for other blogs, you include a backlink to your content on your blog. 

This is often referred to as “guest blogging”.

When writing guest posts, be sure to consider these 5 simple tips:

  • Who is their audience? Who are the people they’re writing for? 
  • What topics will best serve their audience?
  • Can I write about those topics?

These three questions can guide you towards creating external content for other websites to promote your content that’s in your blog. 

Alliance Building 

Another content promotion strategy that really works is alliance building.

Alliance building means that you know who are your networks going online.

If you’re marketing an eCommerce site, who are your partner retailers, manufacturers, or suppliers you could reach out to promote your content?

Here’s the thing: it’s easy to promote content to a person who knows and trusts you.

So why not start with people you’ve known for months and years, and send them an email, telling them of your latest guide, infographic, or resource.

Start by having an inventory of your friends and networks working in the same industry as yours.

You can create a spreadsheet to track these people. Find their email addresses. Send them outreach emails. This leads us to the 5th content promotion strategy. 

Cold outreach

If you don’t have an audience yet, this is the content promotion method for you.

If people don’t know you, then let them know you exist and your content exists.

So start looking for people who might be interested to link or share your content. 

One good strategy here is to know publishers who’ve created similar content and see who has shared or linked to their content.

So if I am writing a piece about a sleeping guide for kids. I want to know who are other publishers created a sleeping guide for kids.

So I go on Google and type in, “sleep guide for kids”.

Here, I see different pages for that same topic. 

Then if I want to know who are the people who linked to those pages, I can use a tool like Ahrefs to find who linked to those pages.

Given if they linked to a page similar to my content, they’d be more likely interested to see, share, or link to my content as well. 

Dream 100 Promotion

Have you ever wondered how others get more attention quickly even if they’re just starting out?

The reason is that they associate themselves with influencers and thought-leaders in the industry.

dream 100

These influencers and thought-leaders are your dream 100. They are the top 100 personalities in your industry. 

If you leverage other people’s influence, you attract more eyeballs and get more massive attention than what a usual marketer can get.

But one question that will arise is this:

How could they interact with thought-leaders and top industry practitioners if they’re not of the same level?

You don’t send them spam messages to do a favor for you without even providing them with value first.

Here are some examples of the value you can give to your dream 100:

  1. Free product/service (e.g. 6-month access to a SaAs premium tool plan)
  2. Interviews (e.g. guest on your show featuring industry experts)
  3. Free content format (e.g. infographic version of their top blog post)

Start promoting your content pieces to Dream100 by giving them initial value. 

Ad Retargeting

The next effective content promotion strategy is ad retargeting. 

Basically, Ad retargeting is creating ads to target people who’ve visited your website. 

Because they’ve known about your brand or content, the cost of your ads would be much lower than if you target a cold audience.

Ad retargeting is hitting warm audiences, which is an effective strategy to constantly build up your audience by showing your ads to people who are familiar with your website. 

Start setting up your Facebook pixel. There are many tutorials on Google that show you how to do that. Then start creating ads to retarget website visitors. 


how to find someones email address

How to Find Someone’s Email Address (In Seconds)

Today, I’m going to show you how to look for someone’s email address with supreme accuracy without spending minutes finding it.

 

Step 1: Use Voila Norbert

Once you have an account, you can use it quickly. Landing on a website,

Voila Norbert is a free chrome extension tool that helps you find email addresses in seconds.

So install hunter to your chrome extension.

Once installed, it’ll appear in your Chrome toolbar.

So when you landed on a website, you click on it. And now you have to enter the prospect’s name and the domain of the website. Then click “Go ahead, Norbert”.

In as fast as 1 second, you’ll quickly see if there is an email attached to the domain.

You can best use Voila Norbert for single-author sites or blogs if you know the specific name of the person you’re reaching out to - which you can quickly see on the blog’s About page.

But for larger companies, you may want to contact a specific person like the content marketing manager or editor in charge of the blog.

Step 2: Try Hunter

Go to Hunter. Create an account.

When you landed on a website, you can quickly find email addresses associated with the domain by clicking Hunter tool in the toolbar.

Now, you’ll have a list of email addresses to choose from, depending on who you want to reach out to.

So let’s say for this website: siegemedia.com; I want to find the content manager.

And by clicking Hunter, it quickly shows me this person to reach out to for email outreach.

Step 3: Find it on About or Contact page

Not all email addresses are hosted in domains.

There are non-domain.com email addresses, such as Gmail accounts.

Here are ways to find these non-domain.com email addresses.

First is to check the website's About or Contact page.

Oftentimes, small blogs or websites will just leave their contact details there.

Step 4: Utilize site advanced search operator

Another way to find non-domain emails is by using a search operator: site:domain.com and then “gmail.com”

Google this exact search, then you’ll be able to see on the meta description in one of the pages in the search results - the exact gmail address.

Step 5: Search Twitter Feed on Google

Another email hunting approach is to first, find the Twitter handle of the author.

Then do a Google search for:

site:twitter.com/twitterhandle/status

And then some footprints like gmail.com or yahoo.com or hotmail.com or anything else.

There you’ll see the Gmail address included in one of the author’s tweets.

Start Email Hunting Today

So those are email hunting approaches that you can use to find email addresses in seconds.

The next thing you also want to do is to verify the email addresses you’ve collected.

For domain-email addresses, you get to see if the email address is verified when you use Hunter or Voila Norbert.

For non-domain email addresses, you may have to use email verification tools.

Email verification tools like Never Bounce and Verfiy Email Address.org are some recommended websites where you can verify your collected email addresses.


The #1 Question You Need to Ask Yourself When Doing Email Outreach

Why should they care? 

This is the #1 question you need to ask yourself when crafting an outreach email. This is huge. And if you ask this question before you write your outreach template, you know that it'll significantly impact your response and conversion rates.

Most people would start with copying and pasting outreach templates they saw on Google. The thing is it the outreach copy doesn’t match first to what you offer, you’re missing the opportunity to highlight your offer and what it does to your target prospect.

Why should your prospects care? What is it in your content they have to pay attention to? Is it something they can distribute on their web properties like blogs or email lists wherein their audience can find value in it.

Highlight in your pitch the answers to this question “what’s in it for your backlink prospects?”


content-gap-analysis-guest-blogging

Content Gap Analysis in Guest Blogging

The first link building strategy is using content gap analysis in guest blogging.

Have you ever received this kind of email? People sending you a pitch for your blog without even having any specific topics. Or even if they sent you topics, they're mostly generic and not thinking of your audience.

This is what we want to avoid, right? 

So the first step to pitch topic ideas that your prospects' audience actually need. 

You can use Ahrefs, it's an SEO tool that has this Content Gap feature. So what it does is it helps you find keywords that you don't rank, but other websites are targeting and ranking. 

So given we are using for guest blogging purposes, you want to look for keywords that your guest blog isn't ranking yet, but its competitors are ranking already.

So now once you pitch to that blog. You don't offer any generic topics. But rather list of topics brainstormed from keywords you know they have the tendency to rank. 

And here's the good thing. The moment your topic was accepted, you submitted your guest content, and because it is targeted to a specific keyword, it now has the tendency to rank for its keyword. And once it ranks, your guest post gains more visibility. It gains more eyeballs from the blog's target audience. And given you have a link from the guest post, you can receive constant referral traffic.