event schema markup

Event Schema Markup - The Newbie Friendly Guide

Google and other search engines are constantly evolving, adding new features and ways to deliver more relevant results to users. Search engines can now understand the context of queries and the user's intent, making it possible to provide more relevant results.

One way that search engines can provide more relevant results is by understanding the meaning of entities on a web page, and how those entities are related to each other. This understanding is made possible through the use of structured data markup.

 

What is Structured Data Markup?

Structured data markup is a code that is added to a web page to help search engines understand the content of the page. It is also used by other applications, such as Google News, to display information more meaningfully.

One of the most important uses of structured data markup is to markup events. Events are a type of entity that can be found on a website and are often associated with a particular date and time. By marking up events using structured data, search engines can understand the context of the event and provide more relevant results to users.

In this article, we will take a look at how to markup events using the Event Schema. We will also provide a few examples of how this markup can be used to improve the visibility of your website in search results.

 

What is Event Schema?

The Event Schema is a type of structured data that can be used to markup events on a web page. It is a set of code that can be added to a page to help search engines understand the content of the page.

The Event Schema is made up of a number of different properties, each of which describes a different aspect of the event. These properties include the name of the event, the location, the date and time, the type of event, and more.

Including an even schema reaps different benefits:

1) Helps Google and other search engines understand your event.

2) Helps your event appear in Rich Snippets in SERPs.

3) Gives you a chance to be included in Google's Local Pack and Maps.

4) It may help your click-through rate (CTR).

5) Can be used to markup both physical and virtual events.

The Event Schema is part of the larger schema.org initiative, which is a joint effort by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo!, and Yandex to create a shared vocabulary for structured data markup.

 

event schema examples

Why Use the Event Schema?

The Event Schema is a great way to help search engines understand the content of your web page. You provide search engines with additional information about your event by including structured data markup on your page. This information can be used to improve the visibility of your event in search results.

In addition to helping search engines understand your event, the Event Schema can also be used to display Rich Snippets in search results. Rich Snippets are special tags that are used to display additional information about a result in search results.

For events, Rich Snippets can include the date and time of the event, the location, and other important information. Including Rich Snippets on your event listing can help your click-through rate (CTR) by making your listing more relevant and informative.

Another benefit of using the Event Schema is that it can be used to markup both physical and virtual events. This is important for businesses that are looking to reach a wider audience with their event listings.

Lastly, the Event Schema is part of the larger schema.org initiative. This means that it is well-supported by major search engines and constantly updated with new features and properties.

 

Event Schema Properties

The Event Schema is made up of many different properties, each of which describes a different aspect of the event. These properties include the name of the event, the location, the date and time, the type of event, and more.

Here is a complete list of the properties that can be used in the Event Schema:

Required:

* name - The name of the event.

* url - The URL of the page that contains the event listing.

* startDate - The date and time that the event starts.

* endDate - The date and time that the event ends.

* location - The location of the event.

 

Recommended:

- name: The name of the event.

- url: The URL of the page that contains the event listing.

- description: A brief description of the event.

- image: An image associated with the event.

- startDate: The date and time when the event starts.

- endDate: The date and time when the event ends.

- location: The location of the event.

- organizer: The organization or person that is organizing the event.

- performance: A performance that is part of the event.

- eventStatus: The status of the event (e.g., upcoming, cancelled, etc.).

- offers: An offer associated with the event.

- eventAttendanceMode: The attendance mode for the event (e.g., online, offline, etc.).

- eventSchedule: The schedule of the event.

- previousStartDate: The start date of a previous instance of the event.

schema markup events in new york

How Do You Create an Event Schema

There are a few different ways to implement the Event Schema on your website - through schema.org markup, using Google Tag Manager, and via WordPress plugin.

The most common way is to use schema.org markup, a type of code that can be added to your page to help search engines understand the page's content.

Another way to implement the Event Schema is to use Google Tag Manager. Google Tag Manager is a tool that allows you to manage and deploy code on your website. With Google Tag Manager, you can add the Event Schema code to your website without editing your site's code.

Finally, you can also use a WordPress plugin to implement the Event Schema on your WordPress site. There are a number of different plugins that you can use, each of which has its own set of features and options.

 

schema markup Wordpress plugin

Some plugins include:

Choosing the right method for implementing the Event Schema will depend on your level of technical expertise and the tools that you have available.

No matter your chosen method, it is important to test your implementation before going live. This will help ensure that the Event Schema code is working properly and that your event listings are being displayed correctly in search results.

 

Event Schema Examples

Here are a few examples of how the Event Schema can be used:

  • A concert listing on a ticketing website.
  • An event listing on a hotel website.
  • A conference listing on a conference website.

Because of its simplicity, Google considers it the most popular structured data format. You can achieve this by adding a JSON-LD structured data snippet to the beginning or <head> section of your event's page. If you're running an online event for free, it might appear as follows:

<html>

  <head>

    <title>Our Big Event</title>

    <script type="application/ld+json">

    {

      "@context": "https://schema.org",

      "@type": "Event",

      "name": "The Big Company Event 2020",

      "startDate": "2020-07-21T09:00:00-07:00",

      "endDate": "2020-07-21T17:00-07:00",

      "eventStatus": "https://schema.org/EventScheduled",

      "eventAttendanceMode": "https://schema.org/OnlineEventAttendanceMode",

      "location": {

        "@type": "VirtualLocation",

        "url": "https://theurlwhereattendeescanjoin.com/"

        },

      "image": [

        "https://example.com/photos/1x1/photo.jpg",

        "https://example.com/photos/4x3/photo.jpg",

        "https://example.com/photos/16x9/photo.jpg"

       ],

      "description": "Join us for our big 2020 event!",

      "isAccessibleForFree": true,

      "organizer": {

        "@type": "Organization",

        "name": "Your company name",

        "url": "https://www.companyhomepage.com"

      }

    }

    </script>

  </head>

  <body>

  </body>

</html>

 

Event Schema Generators

If you don't want to write the Event Schema code yourself, you can use several generators to create the code for you. These generators will ask you for information about your events, such as the name, date, location, and description, and then they will generate the code for you.

Some of the most popular Event Schema generators include:

After generating the code, you can add it to your website. Be sure to test your implementation before going live to ensure everything is working correctly.

 

How to Test Your Event Schema Markup

After adding the Event Schema code to your website, you can use Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to test your implementation. To use the tool, simply enter the URL of the page where you've added the code, and Google will analyze the page and tell you if there are any errors or warnings.

If there are no errors or warnings, then your Event Schema code is working correctly, and your event listings should start appearing in search results. If there are errors or warnings, you'll need to fix them before your listings appear.

Key Takeaway:

Event Schema is a code that you can add to your website to help search engines understand your event listings. There are several different ways to add the code to your website, and there are a number of different generators you can use to create the code for you.

The events industry has continued to evolve over the years, and using schema markup is one way to ensure your events are being discovered by potential guests.

Event Schema - Frequently Asked Questions

What are the different types of schema?

  • Review Schema
  • FAQ Schema
  • HowTo Schema
  • Local Business Schema
  • Logo Schema
  • Product Schema
  • Event Schema
  • Article Schema
  • Course Schema
  • Job Posting Scheme
  • Recipe Scheme

 

What is event schema in SEO?

In SEO, event schema is a type of structured data that can be added to a website to help search engines understand the information on the page. An event schema can be used to mark up events, such as concerts, conferences, and hotel bookings. Adding event schema to a page can help it rank higher in search results for relevant queries.

 

How to mark an entire event website with one schema code?

To mark an entire event website with one schema code, you can add the code to the website's <head> section. This will ensure that all the site pages are marked up with the event schema code.

 

How to use event schema for multiple dates?

If you have an event that spans multiple dates, you can use the event schema code to mark up each individual date. This will help search engines understand the information on the page and provide users with more relevant results.

It will be ideal to use EventSeries, as recommended by SchemaOrg.

"An EventSeries is a collection of events that share some unifying characteristic. For example, "The Olympic Games" is a series, which is repeated regularly. The "2012 London Olympics" can be presented both as an Event in the series "Olympic Games", and as an EventSeries that included a number of sporting competitions as Events.

The nature of the association between the events in an EventSeries can vary, but typical examples could include a thematic event series (e.g. topical meetups or classes), or a series of regular events that share a location, attendee group and/or organizers."

Example:

<script type="application/ld+json">

[{

 "@context" : "http://schema.org",

 "@type" : "EventSeries",

 "@id" : "http://www.olympic.org/olympic-games",

 "name" : "Olympic Games",

 "subEvent" : "http://www.olympic.org/rio-2016-summer-olympics",

 "subEvent" : "http://www.olympic.org/london-2012-summer-olympics"

},

{

 "@context" : "http://schema.org",

 "@type" : "Event",

 "@id" : "http://www.olympic.org/rio-2016-summer-olympics",

 "name" : "The Rio 2016 Summer Olympics",

 "startDate" : "2016-08-05",

 "endDate" : "2016-08-21",

 "url" : "http://www.rio2016.com",

 "offers" : {

   "@type" : "Offer",

   "url" : "http://www.rio2016.com/en/tourist-information"

 },

 "superEvent" : "http://www.olympic.org/olympic-games",

 "subEvent" : "http://www.rio2016.com/en/rowing"

},

{

 "@context" : "http://schema.org",

 "@type" : "Event",

 "@id" : "http://www.rio2016.com/en/rowing",

 "location" : {

   "@type" : "Place",

   "name" : "Lagoa Stadium",

   "address" : "Av. Borges de Medeiros, 1524 - Lagoa, Rio de Janeiro - RJ, 22470-003, Brazil"

 },

 "startDate" : "2016-08-06",

 "endDate" : "2016-08-13",

 "superEvent": "http://www.olympic.org/rio-2016-summer-olympics"

},

{

 "@context" : "http://schema.org",

 "@type": "Event",

 "@id" : "http://www.olympic.org/london-2012-summer-olympics",

 "name" : "The London 2012 Summer Olympics",

 "startDate" : "2012-07-27",

 "endDate" : "2012-08-12",

 "superEvent" : "http://www.olympic.org/olympic-games"

}]

</script>

 

Can I use Event Schema Markup for past events?

It is generally not recommended to use Event Schema Markup for past events, as the primary purpose of the markup is to provide information about upcoming events. However, if you have a website that includes information about past events and you want to provide additional context and detail about those events, you can use Event Schema Markup to do so.

It is important to note that using Event Schema Markup for past events may not be as effective as using it for upcoming events, as the markup is primarily designed to provide information about events that are yet to occur.

Additionally, using Event Schema Markup for past events may not be as useful for users, as the event has already occurred and the information provided by the markup may not be relevant.

If you do choose to use Event Schema Markup for past events, it is important to use accurate and up-to-date information and to test the markup using Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to ensure it is correct and valid.

 

Can I use Event Schema Markup for events that are not ticketed?

Yes, you can use Event Schema Markup for events that are not ticketed. When adding Event Schema Markup for a free event, you should include information about whether or not registration is required and any other relevant details.

To use Event Schema Markup for a free event, you can include the "offers" property in your markup and set the "availability" property to "InStock" and the "price" property to "0". For example:

"offers": {
"@type": "Offer",
"availability": "InStock",
"price": "0",
"priceCurrency": "USD"
}

It is important to note that using Event Schema Markup for a free event may not be as effective as using it for ticketed events, as the markup is primarily designed to provide information about events that require a ticket or admission fee. Additionally, using Event Schema Markup for a free event may not be as useful for users, as there is no cost associated with attending the event.

If you do choose to use Event Schema Markup for a free event, it is important to use accurate and up-to-date information and to test the markup using Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to ensure it is correct and valid.

 

Can I use Event Schema Markup in conjunction with other types of structured data?

Yes, you can use Event Schema Markup in conjunction with other types of structured data, such as Product Schema Markup or Local Business Schema Markup. This can help search engines understand the context and content of your website more accurately and improve the visibility of your website in search results.

For example, you could use Event Schema Markup to provide detailed information about an event being held at a local business, and use Local Business Schema Markup to provide information about the business itself. Or, you could use Event Schema Markup to provide information about a product launch event, and use Product Schema Markup to provide information about the product being launched.

To use Event Schema Markup in conjunction with other types of structured data, you will need to include both sets of markup in the HTML code of your website. It is important to ensure that the markup is valid and accurately reflects the content of your website, and to test the markup using Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to ensure it is correct and valid.

 

Is it necessary to use Event Schema Markup on all pages that contain information about an event?

It is generally recommended to use Event Schema Markup on all pages that contain information about an event, as the markup provides detailed information about the event and can help search engines understand the context and content of your website more accurately. However, it is not strictly necessary to use Event Schema Markup on every page that mentions an event, especially if the event is mentioned only briefly or in passing.

Using Event Schema Markup on pages that contain detailed information about an event can help improve the visibility of those pages in search results, particularly for searches related to the event. It can also provide a better user experience, as users can find more detailed and accurate information about the event.

If you do choose to use Event Schema Markup on pages that contain information about an event, it is important to use accurate and up-to-date information and to test the markup using Google's Structured Data Testing Tool to ensure it is correct and valid.

 


seo kpis

SEO KPIs: How to Measure and Track SEO Success

According to Search Engine Journal, organic search generates the highest return on investment of any marketing channel, with 49 percent of marketers believing it.

The numbers alone should be enough to convince any business owner or marketing manager that SEO is worth their time and money. But as with any marketing strategy, it's important to set goals and track progress to ensure success.

That's where SEO KPIs come in.

KPIs, or Key Performance Indicators, are metrics used to measure and track progress towards a specific goal. In the context of SEO, they can be used to track everything from website traffic to keyword rankings.

Choosing the right SEO KPIs will depend on your specific goals and objectives. However, there are some general metrics that all businesses should track.

 

Website Traffic

One of the most important SEO KPIs is website traffic. This metric measures the number of visitors to your website from all sources, including organic search, direct traffic, and referral traffic.

Website traffic is a good indicator of the overall health of your SEO efforts. If you're seeing an increase in website traffic, it's likely that your SEO strategy is working. Conversely, a decrease in website traffic could be a sign that something is wrong.

There are a number of ways to track website traffic, including Google Analytics and other web analytics tools.

google analytics seo kpis

Organic Search Traffic

Organic search traffic is the number of visitors to your website from organic search results. This metric is important because it measures the success of your SEO efforts in attracting visitors from search engines.

Organic search traffic can be tracked using Google Analytics and other web analytics tools.

 

Keyword Rankings

Another important SEO KPI is keyword rankings. This metric measures how well your website ranks for specific keywords in search engine results pages (SERPs).

Tracking keyword rankings can help you identify which keywords are driving traffic to your website and which ones need more work. There are a number of tools that you can use to track keyword rankings, including Google Search Console and Moz's Keyword Explorer.

moz seo kpis

 

Backlinks

Backlinks are links from other websites to your website. They're important because they're one of the factors that search engines use to rank websites in SERPs.

The number of backlinks that a website has is a good indicator of the website's popularity and authority. The more backlinks a website has, the higher it is likely to rank in SERPs.

Backlinks can be tracked using Google Search Console and other webmaster tools.

Some notable tools for backlink tracking are as follows:

  1. Majestic
  2. Moz
  3. Ahrefs
  4. SEMrush
  5. SEO SpyGlass
  6. Raven Tools
  7. LinkResearchTools

 

Which Types of Backlinks Should You Be Tracking?

Not all backlinks are created equal. Some backlinks are more valuable than others.

The most valuable backlinks are from websites that are popular, have high domain authority, and are relevant to your website.

Google values three factors in ranking. These are Relevance, Trust and Power.

Relevance:This is how much your website is related to the backlink website. A backlink from a website about “dogs” will be more valuable if your website is also about “dogs”.

Trust: This measures how trustworthy the backlinking website is. Google considers websites with many backlinks as more trustworthy than those with fewer backlinks.

Power: This measures the popularity of the backlinking website. A website with many visitors is more popular than a website with fewer visitors.

To track the value of your backlinks, you can use a tool like Moz's Link Explorer. This tool will show you the domain authority of the linking website, as well as the page authority of the specific page that's linking to you.

 

Social Shares

Social shares are the number of times your content is shared on social media. This metric is important because it can help to increase the reach of your content and attract new visitors to your website.

There are a number of ways to track social shares, including using social media analytics tools such as Hootsuite Insights and Sprout Social.

 

New Content

Publishing new content is an important part of any SEO strategy. This metric measures how much new content you're publishing on your website.

New content can help to attract new visitors to your website, as well as keep existing visitors coming back for more. It can also help to improve your website's ranking in SERPs.

To track the amount of new content you're publishing, you can use a tool like Google Analytics. This will show you how much traffic your website is getting from new visitors.

You can also use a tool like WordPress to track how many new posts or pages you're publishing on your website. Additionally, Surfer SEO has a Content Editor that allows users to create new optimized content and track their progress.

 

Organic Visibility

Organic visibility is the number of times your website appears in SERPs. This metric is important because it measures how visible your website is to potential visitors.

There are a number of ways to track organic visibility, including using Google Search Console and other webmaster tools. Additionally, you can use a tool like Moz's Rank Tracker to track your website's ranking in SERPs.

Here are some quick tips on how to improve your organic visibility:

Optimizing Titles and Meta Descriptions

Your title and meta description are two of the most important elements on your website. These are what show up in SERPs, so it's important to make sure they're optimized for your target keywords.

To do this, you can use a tool like Surfer SEO's Title Optimizer. This tool will help you to create optimized titles and meta descriptions for your website.

 

Making your website mobile-friendly

Making sure your website is mobile-friendly is important for two reasons. First, more and more people are using mobile devices to access the internet. Second, Google has announced that they will be using mobile-friendliness as a ranking factor in their algorithm.

To make sure your website is mobile-friendly, you can use a tool like Google's Mobile-Friendly Test. This tool will analyze your website and tell you if it is mobile-friendly or not.

 

Improving website speed

Website speed is another important ranking factor in Google's algorithm. In addition, users are more likely to abandon a website that takes too long to load.

To improve your website speed, you can use a tool like Google's PageSpeed Insights. This tool will analyze your website and give you specific recommendations on how to improve your speed.

 

Page Load Time

Page load time is the amount of time it takes for a page on your website to load. This metric is important because it can affect your website's ranking in SERPs and the user experience of your visitors.

 

Conversions

Conversions are the number of visitors to your website who take the desired action, such as making a purchase or signing up for a newsletter. This metric is important because it measures whether your SEO efforts are resulting in real-world results.

Some examples of conversions are:

Affiliate Clicks:

Affiliate clicks are the number of times an affiliate link is clicked. This metric is important for measuring the success of your affiliate marketing efforts.

Affiliate clicks can be tracked using a number of tools, including Google Analytics and Clickbank.

 

E-commerce Sales:

E-commerce sales are the total value of all sales made through your online store. This metric is important for measuring the success of your e-commerce business.

E-commerce sales can be tracked using a number of tools, including Google Analytics and Shopify.

 

Newsletter Signups:

Newsletter signups are the number of people who sign up for your newsletter. This metric is important for measuring the success of your content marketing efforts.

Newsletter signups can be tracked using a number of tools, including MailChimp and Constant Contact.

 

Leads:

Leads are the contact information of people who have expressed interest in your product or service. This metric is important for measuring the success of your lead generation efforts.

Leads can be tracked using a number of tools, including Salesforce and HubSpot.

 

Bounce Rate

Bounce rate is the percentage of visitors to your website who leave after viewing only one page. This metric is important because it measures how well your website is holding the attention of its visitors.

Bounce rate can be tracked using a number of tools, including Google Analytics and Pingdom.

bounce rate google analytics

 

There are a number of ways to track conversions, including using web analytics tools such as Google Analytics and conversion tracking tools such as Crazy Egg.

 

Improve What You Can Measure

These are some of the most important SEO KPIs that all businesses should track. By tracking these metrics, you can measure the success of your SEO efforts and make necessary adjustments to ensure that your website is ranking highly in SERPs.

SEO KPIs are important metrics to track the progress of your SEO efforts. If you are tracking the right KPIs, you can ensure that your SEO strategy is on track and achieving its objectives.

What are some other important SEO KPIs that businesses should track? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you track backlinks in Google Analytics?

Yes, you can track backlinks in Google Analytics by using the Inbound Links report.

To find this report, log into your Google Analytics account and navigate to Acquisition > All Traffic > Channels. Then, click on the Organic Search tab and scroll down to the Inbound Links section.

 

Why are backlinks important for SEO?

Backlinks are important for SEO because they act as a vote of confidence from other websites. When a website links to your website, it is effectively saying that your website is a good source of information on the topic that it is linking to.

Here are 4 reasons why backlinks are important for SEO:

1. They Improve Your Rankings in SERPs

One of the most important ways that backlinks improve your SEO is by helping you to rank higher in SERPs. Google uses a metric called PageRank to determine the ranking of websites in its search results.

PageRank is based on the number and quality of backlinks pointing to a website. So, websites with more and higher-quality backlinks will tend to rank higher in SERPs than those with fewer and lower-quality backlinks.

2. They Help You to Get More Traffic from Google

Another way that backlinks improve your SEO is by helping you to get more traffic from Google.

Google uses backlinks as one of the main factors in its algorithm for determining a website's PageRank. So, the more backlinks you have pointing to your website, the higher your PageRank will be, and the more traffic you'll get from Google.

3. They Help You to Build Relationships with Other Websites

Backlinks can also help you to build relationships with other websites. When you get a backlink from another website, it's a good opportunity to reach out to the site owner and let them know.

This can help you to build a relationship with the site owner, which can be beneficial for your SEO. For example, if the site owner is happy with the relationship, they may be more likely to link to your website again in the future.

4. They Make Your Website Look More Trustworthy

Backlinks can also help to make your website look more trustworthy. This is because backlinks from high-quality websites act as a vote of confidence from those websites.

When Google sees that your website has backlinks from high-quality websites, it will be more likely to trust your website and rank it higher in SERPs.

 

Is bounce rate a good KPI?

Bounce rate is a good KPI because it measures how well your website is holding the attention of its visitors. A high bounce rate indicates that visitors are leaving your website quickly, which could be a sign that your website is not relevant or interesting to them.

A low bounce rate, on the other hand, indicates that visitors are staying on your website and engaging with your content. This is a good sign that your website is relevant and interesting to them.

 

What is a KPI dashboard?

A KPI dashboard is a tool that allows you to track, visualize, and analyze your KPIs in one place. Dashboards can be used to track any kind of metric, but they are especially useful for tracking KPIs because they allow you to see all of your KPIs in one place and compare them side-by-side.


google penalty

How to Check If You Have Google Penalty - A Beginners Guide

Have you noticed a sudden drop in your website's Google search ranking? Are you getting less traffic from Google organic searches? If so, it's possible that a Google penalty has hit you. In this article, we'll explain what a Google penalty is, how to check if you have one, and what you can do to recover from it.

 

What is a Google Penalty?

A Google penalty is an action that Google takes against a website violating their Webmaster Guidelines. This can result in a drop in the website's search ranking and organic traffic from Google.

Technically, a Google penalty for your website means that Google has applied a manual action to your site. Manual actions are usually taken when Google's algorithms have detected serious violations of their Webmaster Guidelines, such as black-hat SEO tactics, spammy content, or link schemes.

If you get a manual action against your website, you will receive a message in Google Search Console (formerly known as Google Webmaster Tools). This message will explain the issue and how you can fix it.

 

What are the Types of Google Penalties?

There are two types of penalties: manual and algorithmic.

Manual penalties are imposed by Google employees when they manually review a website and determine that it is violating their guidelines. Manual penalties are usually the result of black hat SEO practices, such as keyword stuffing or link buying.

Algorithmic penalties, on the other hand, are imposed automatically by Google's algorithms when they detect that a website is violating their guidelines. These penalties can be the result of both black-hat and white-hat SEO practices. For example, a website may be penalized for using too many keywords on a page (keyword stuffing) or for having low-quality content (thin content).

What are some Google Penalty Triggers?

You need to make sure that your site does not engage in any activities that can trigger a penalty, such as:

Keyword stuffing: cramming too many keywords into your content in an attempt to manipulate your website's search ranking. This is considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can be a manual penalty.

Link buying: paying for links in order to manipulate your website's search ranking. This is also considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can result in a manual penalty.

Link schemes: participating in link schemes in order to manipulate your website's search ranking. This can include things like buying links, selling links, or exchanging links solely for the purpose of artificially boosting your search ranking. Link schemes are against Google's Webmaster Guidelines and can result in a manual penalty.

Thin content: having pages on your website with little or no useful content. This can be the result of keyword stuffing ( cramming too many keywords into your content) or simply not having enough helpful and informative content on your site. Thin content is considered low-quality by Google and can result in an algorithmic penalty.

Cloaking: presenting different content or URLs to human users and search engines. This is considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can result in a manual penalty. This applies to texts, images, videos or any other type of web content.

Deceptive redirects: redirecting users to a different page than the one they clicked on. This is considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can result in a manual penalty.

Duplicate content: having the same or similar content on your website as another website. This can result from plagiarism or simply not having enough original content on your site. Google considers Duplicate content low-quality and can result in an algorithmic penalty.

How to Check if You Have a Google Penalty

The first step is to check whether you have received any manual action messages in Google Search Console. To do this, go to Search Console and click "Security & Manual Actions" in the left-hand sidebar.

search console manual actions

If you see any messages here, it means that Google has taken manual action against your website. Click on the message to learn more about the problem and how to fix it.

 

Different manual actions imposed by Google:

Site-wide matches:

Site-wide matches are manual actions that apply to an entire website. The entire website is affected by the penalty, not just individual pages or sections.

Partial matches:

Partial matches are manual actions that only affect some of the pages on a website. This means that the penalty affects only certain pages or sections, not the entire website.

partial matches manual action

 

Examples of manual actions:

Thin content with little or no added value:

This manual action is imposed on websites that have pages with little or no useful content. This can result from keyword stuffing ( cramming too many keywords into your content) or simply not having enough helpful and informative content on your site.

Links to bad neighborhoods:

This manual action is imposed on websites that have links to websites that engage in spammy or illegal behavior. This can include things like buying links, selling links, or exchanging links solely for the purpose of artificially boosting your search ranking. Linking to these kinds of websites can hurt your website's reputation and can result in a manual penalty.

User-generated spam:

This manual action is imposed on websites that have user-generated content (such as comments, forum posts, etc.) that is spammy or abusive. This can result in a manual penalty.

Coaking and/or sneaky redirects:

This manual action is imposed on websites that use cloaking (presenting different content or URLs to human users and search engines) or sneaky redirects (redirecting users to a different page than the one they clicked on). This is considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can result in a manual penalty.

Hacked site:

This manual action is imposed on websites that have been hacked. This can result in a manual penalty.

 

Pure spam:

This manual action is imposed on websites that are nothing but spam. This can include things like keyword stuffing, cloaking, and redirects. This is considered a black-hat SEO tactic and can result in a manual penalty.

If you don't see any messages about manual action, it doesn't necessarily mean that you don't have a penalty. Google also imposes algorithmic penalties that are not announced in Search Console. These are typically the result of low-quality content, excessive spammy behavior, or black-hat SEO tactics.

To check for algorithmic penalties, the first step is to check your website's traffic in Google Analytics. If you see a sudden and significant drop in traffic, it could be the result of an algorithmic penalty.

Even if you don't see any messages about manual actions, it's possible that your website has been hit by a Google penalty. For example, if your website's search ranking has dropped suddenly and significantly, it's possible that you've been hit by an algorithmic penalty

7 Google Penalty Checker Tools to Help You Recover Your Website

SemRush Sensor

Using SemRush Sensor allows you to see recent Google algorithm changes that could be the reason for a drop in traffic.

Since it has the biggest search database, it's one of the most accurate Google penalty checker tools available.

You need to check on the Volatility score, which is the percentage of queries that were affected by a Google update.

If the volatility score is high, then it's likely that your website was affected by a recent algorithm change.

semrush sensor

MozCast

MozCast is a weather report for the Google algorithm.

It tracks major Google algorithm changes in real-time and sends out alerts whenever there's a significant change.

This is a valuable tool for keeping track of algorithm updates that could potentially impact your website.

mozcast

Accuranker Grump Meter

The Accuranker Grump Meter is a tool that measures changes in the Google algorithm.

It gives you a grump score based on how volatile the algorithm is.

A score of 0 means that there are no major changes, while a score of 10 means that there are significant changes. 12-15 means that there's an algorithm update in progress and is unusual.

accuranker grump meterWhen you go to the site, you can pick the country or leave it as worldwide, choose desktop/mobile as the device, and get your rating.

 

Panguin Tool

Panguin Tool is a Google penalty checker tool that shows you how your traffic has changed in relation to specific Google algorithm updates.

This is a valuable tool for pinpointing which algorithm changes have impacted your website the most.

To use the tool, you need to connect your Google Analytics account.

Once you've done that, you can see a list of algorithm updates and how they've impacted your traffic.

You can also see which keywords have been affected by each update.

panguin tool

Fruition

Fruition is a Google penalty checker tool that allows you to see how your traffic has changed in relation to specific Google algorithm updates.

This is a valuable tool for pinpointing which algorithm changes have impacted your website the most.

It's a freemium tool that'll ask you to connect your Google Analytics account. Once you've done that, you can see a list of algorithm updates and how they've impacted your traffic.

fruition

Website Penalty Indicator by FEinternational

The Website Penalty Indicator by FEinternational is a tool that allows you to check if your website has been hit by a Google penalty.

To use the tool, you need to enter your website's URL and choose the type of penalty you want to check for.

The tool will then scan your website and give you a report on whether or not a penalty has hit you.

website penalty indicator

 

Rank Ranger

Rank Ranger is a tool that allows you to track your website's rankings in Google.

It also has a feature that allows you to check for Google penalties.

You'll get graphs showing the last 30-day rank fluctuations of both the desktop and mobile indexes.

rankranger google serps

Key Takeaways

At the end of the day, it's always better to feel safe than sorry. If you think you might have received a Google penalty, your best bet is to check.

There are many different tools that you can use to check for penalties, and they all have their own unique features.

Finding one that works for you and that you're comfortable using is important. With the right tool, you'll be able to quickly and easily check for penalties, so you can get back to business as usual.

For that reason, the best bet is always to do quality SEO right from the start. That way, you avoid any type of manual or algorithmic penalties from Google. If you focus on delivering quality content that satisfies searcher intent, you’ll be on the right track.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why does organic traffic decrease?

There are many reasons why organic traffic can decrease.

Some of the most common reasons include:

  • Google algorithm updates
  • Changes in search engine ranking algorithms
  • Loss of backlinks
  • Website design changes that negatively impact usability
  • Poor content quality
  • Negative SEO attacks

If you're noticing a decrease in organic traffic, it's important to check for any of these potential causes.

How can you identify a manual penalty?

If you think you've received a manual penalty, the first thing you should do is check your Google Search Console account. If you see a message from Google that says your site has been manually penalized, it will usually tell you what the problem is.

 

Does Google penalize spam links?

Yes, Google can penalize your website for having spammy links. If you have a lot of low-quality links pointing to your website, it can hurt your ranking on Google.

To avoid this, you should only build links from high-quality websites. You should also use link disavowal if spammy links are pointing to your website.

 

How long does a Google penalty last? 

A Google penalty can last anywhere from a few days to a few months. If you've been hit by a manual penalty, it will usually take longer for the penalty to be lifted.